Preservation Awards

The 2018 East Tennessee Preservation Awards were announced on Thursday, November 1, at the East Tennessee History Center in downtown Knoxville. The East Tennessee Preservation Awards recognize outstanding individuals, organizations, and projects contributing to the protection of East Tennessee’s heritage.

2018 Knox County Award Winners

Click here to view the 2018 regional awards.

Rick Mallory restored the 1930 Abe Schwartz house at 714 North Beaman Street in the Chilhowee Park neighborhood. This grand home sat vacant, condemned, and badly deteriorated for seven years. In June 2017, Rick took on the task of faithfully restoring this home to its former glory.

Knoxville History Project’s newest publication, Knoxville’s National Cemetery – A Short History, tells the story of this iconic historic cemetery and was researched and written by Executive Director, Jack Neely and edited and image sourced by Director of Development, Paul James. This publication was made possible by a grant from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ Veterans Legacy Program through the University of Tennessee.

Over the past 13 years, the Airplane Filling Station Preservation Association has restored and cared for this iconic structure. The airplane was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004 and the community rallied around fundraising efforts. The Airplane Filling Station Preservation Association (AFSPA) worked to raise funds to restore the plane.

In July 2018, Dewhirst Properties finished the restoration of the Keener Lighting Building located at 701 World’s Fair Park Drive. Built in 1929 by Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, this building was later home to General Electric Supply Corporation and the Keener Lighting Company.

Marble Hall was built in 1958 as a chapel for Lakeshore Mental Health Institute. The goal was to both preserve the history of Marble Hall and make it a welcoming space for the public. Johnson Architecture took on the task of reimagining the use and restoring the iconic structure to allow the public to enjoy the space inside and out. The structural wooden frame and ceiling, intricate rose window and Tennessee marble cladding remain.

Beginning in 2017, Bob and Melynda Whetsel undertook a major renovation to 1012 Gratz Street, a 1913 craftsman home in the Historic Fourth & Gill neighborhood. Upon completion of the project, the home was sold and placed back into owner occupied hands and will be enjoyed by a new family for years to come.

Park City Improvement Company recently renovated the 1929 G. Hill Grocery Store at 2300 E. Magnolia Avenue. They updated and restored this once iconic commercial building on Magnolia Avenue. The partnership of Park City Improvement Company includes John Craig, James Rochelle, and Jennifer Montgomery and Suzy Trotta of Trotta Montgomery Real Estate. Trotta Montgomery Real Estate occupies the majority of the building.

The Press Room, a 600 person community event space and performance venue was built as the Dewine Building in 1923. Located at 730 N. Broadway, it was built as a showroom for the L.S. Harris Motor Co. In 1939 it served as a 12 lane bowling alley and had other uses until it was purchased by RRI Project, LLC/Spaces in the City in 2017. Local architects Sanders Pace Architecture restored the building and it retains historic elements that include the original steel truss structure, wood decking, concrete floors, and brick walls.

The home at 2115 Coker Avenue was purchased by Kyle Anne Lang in 2016 through the City of Knoxville’s Homemaker’s Program. The house had been abandoned and condemned for 11 years. The home, an unusual mix of Victorian and Craftsman styles, took 10 months to restore.

This year, the Museum of East Tennessee History celebrates its 25th anniversary. Opened in 1993 by the East Tennessee Historical Society, the museum’s vision is to preserve and interpret the regions rich history. Over the past 25 years, they have collected over 15,000 artifacts and produced award-winning interpretive exhibits. Everyone from school children to seniors can visit the museum and learn about the people, places, and historic events that have shaped the East Tennessee region.