Church Street United Methodist Church (52)

Church-Street-United-Methodist-Church

900 Henley Street

Church Street United Methodist Church (UMC) kept its name when moving from its original site, on Church Street near Walnut Street, to its current location. The congregation’s building committee chose a Gothic Revival theme from four design proposals prepared by the New York architecture firm John Russell Pope (1874–1937). Best-known for his work in DC, Pope also designed the H.L. Dulin House on Kingston Pike 15 years earlier. The church, however, is often seen as an exemplar of the ideals of local architect Charles Barber (1887–1962), who loved the gothic style. The Knoxville firm of Barber & McMurry acted as the local cooperating architect. Ground was broken for the new building on March 13, 1930, and the building’s estimated cost was $525,000.

The church’s exterior is made of Crab Orchard sandstone, quarried near Rockwood. An exterior pulpit, designed for outdoor services and meetings, faces the courtyard. The church is also notable for its stained glass windows, which were designed by Charles J. Connick of Boston, one of the leaders in the design and manufacture of stained glass in the 20th century.

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